HomeEntertainmentCelebrities'Long-lost English Crown Jewels' found by metal detectorist on Lincolnshire farm

‘Long-lost English Crown Jewels’ found by metal detectorist on Lincolnshire farm

The long-lost treasure of King John – who lost the Crown Jewels of England as he attempted to cross marshy ground near the Wash – may have been unearthed by a metal detectorist who was scanning a farm in a Lincolnshire village

Raymond Kosschuk, 63, is “100% certain” the 800-year-old artefacts he has uncovered at an undisclosed site belonged to the former King of England.

The mechanical engineer has been conducting tests at the site in Sutton Bridge in Lincs. for the past 12 months in an attempt to locate the mysterious hoard.

Raymond is now convinced he has struck gold after his equipment picked up “overwhelming evidence” of the treasure.



Raymond has been conducting tests at an undisclosed site in Sutton Bridge
Raymond has been conducting tests at an undisclosed site in Sutton Bridge

Raymond and the farmer are hoping to start digging out their findings in the coming weeks before submitting them to archeologists and Lincolnshire’s Finds Officer.

King John, who signed Magna Carta in 1216 before his death, lost the treasure on the fateful crossing of The Wash. This estuary divides Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Lincolnshire. It happened on October 12, 201216.

The hoard remained undiscovered for more than a year after King John died at Newark Castle (Notts.) from dysentery. Others believe that he had consumed poisoned beer.



So far he's only dug up nails and horseshoes, but he's convinced that silver and gold are down there
So far he’s only dug up nails and horseshoes, but he’s convinced that silver and gold are down there

Now, after gaining access to the site on Tuesday, September 7, Raymond believes he has solved the mystery of the unpopular monarch’s lost treasure.

Raymond has been able to identify high-value items by using an equipment he created that detects anomalies in the magnetic fields readings.

A quick sweep using a metal detector has led to the discovery of a variety of artifacts, including nails and an eyelet.



Raymond is convinced he has found a site that archaeologists have been looking for for centuries
Raymond is convinced he has found a site that archaeologists have been looking for for centuries

Raymond, of Keighley of West Yorks., said: “I am 100% certain that this it. This is the real thing.

“When I gained access, I isolated an area of high value targets and it tested positive for elements of gold, silver, emeralds, sapphires and rubies.

“The biggest attraction of this area I detected an is accumulation of silver.

“I believe there is 60-120 lb silver, but it could be much more. This is the cash box King John was carrying.”

Raymond has also had positive tests for gold and hopes to have found the Royal Regalia from the 13th century which was lost when the treasure disappeared.



King John is best remembered for signing Magna Carta, one of the founding documents of British democracy
King John is best remembered for signing Magna Carta, one of the founding documents of British democracy

He said: “There is something there or I won’t have the high readings or reactions that I am getting.

“It is sitting out there and if it was so easy to find it would have been found. This document has been kept secret for 800 years.”

Raymond believes that King John had set off from King’s Lynn, Norfolk, without a guide and the baggage train, made-up of 2,000 people and more than a mile long, was then caught up in a thick fog.

He added: “I have seen the heavy fog, and they didn’t have compasses in the 13th century.

“If the sun was blocked out because of the fog, they would have meandered off.”

Raymond believes that the treasure is evident from his four-part readings of horse shoes.

He said: “Those horse shoes are completely damning evidence – there is no question”The field is littered with this kind of find.

“I have never seen anything like the field itself. It is phenomenal the amount of readings it is giving off there.

“I’m expecting to find items between 2 and 11 feet down.

'Long-lost English Crown Jewels' found by metal detectorist on Lincolnshire farm
Anurag Reddy
I'm a 29-year-old travel enthusiast, travel and nature photographer, Computer Science graduate, and Mass Communication student. I have seen different shades of life through traveling and lived different lives through reading. With every word I write, I travel within, and I understand myself better. Writing helps me discover myself, and that paved roads for me to choose writing as a profession.
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